San Diego Notary Services (619) 442-8585
SD Signings

That’s when you know you’ve stumbled upon gold! Their service is always professional and affordable, and their reputation in the industry is full of integrity!

Lacey S

Sr. Director of Finance and Operations, NuSI (Nutrition Science Initiative)

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Why do I need a notary for my documents? Is it important?*


A notary or “Notary Public” is a public servant in good standing with the State of California meant to deter fraud and protect you, others and the community. Usually a notary is called in concerning important document signings pertaining to finance, health care, family guardianship, and property. The notary’s job is to identify you through an active form of positive ID. The notary would ensure you were willingly signing a document. The SD Signings notary would help to affirm that the transaction is reputable and honest.

So again, “why is it so important to have a notary?”

Let’s say someone (not you) signs a document in your name that grants John Smith full access to all of your bank accounts. John Smith would have a power of attorney to use your funds at his leisure. The bankers involved assume that you signed the papers granting John Smith full privileges to your money. This poses a problem, because you didn’t sign any paperwork for John Smith to have powers over your bank account. Fortunately, we live in a society that has taken precautions to prevent this. Typically a bank will require a “power of attorney”  document to have been notarized. This means a notary must identify you personally, obtain your acknowledgement that you willingly signed the document, and affirm that everything seems on the up and up before stamping and providing a notarial certificate. John Smith and his accomplices now have a problem of their own. The SD Signings notary acts very much like a sentinel standing between attempts of document fraud. 

The same concept applies in other important scenarios.  You don’t want a stranger or someone that cannot be trusted managing your property, family’s health, private information, child’s guardianship, or savings without your permission. So a SD Signings notary is often called in for these situations.

*please consult an attorney for legal advice or information pertaining to your documents, a notary is not qualified to provide legal advice. Contacting the receiving agency may also prove helpful for information as to their specific requirements for processing. 

Documents typically Requiring a Notary by SD Signings.*


 

Financial Documents

  • Durable Power of Attorney
  • Limited Power of Attorney
  • General Power of Attorney
  • Property Deeds
  • Life Insurance Affidavit
  • Affidavit of Occupancy
  • Short Sale Affidavit
  • Compliance Agreement
  • Name and Signature Affidavit
  • Financial Power of Attorney
  • Certification of Trust

 

 

Health Care Documents

  • HIPAA Waiver
  • Authorization for Use or Disclosure of Protected Health Information
  • Health Care Power of Attorney
  • Advance Health Care Directive
  • Hospital Paperwork
  • Health Insurance Paperwork
  • Health Insurance Affidavits

Family Documents

  • Living Trusts
  • Consent To Travel
  • Estate Plans
  • Adoption Paperwork
  • Grant Deeds, Quitclaim Deeds, Inter-spousal deeds
  • Car / Auto Papers
  • Home papers
  • Bank Paperwork
  • Contest Winner
  • Declaration of Trust Ownership of Personal Property
  • Community Property Agreement
  • Martial Settlement Agreements
  • Affidavit of Death
  • Copy of Birth Certificate, College Transcripts, Passport
    (We may affix and take your sworn statement to a documents validity upon request) 

Business Documents

  • Applications
  • Deeds
  • Licenses
  • Affidavits
  • Sworn Statements
  • Agreements
  • Powers of Attorney
  • Permits
  • Apostille Documents (Delivery to Secretary of State)
  • San Diego County Authentications and Certifications ( Delivery to San Diego County Clerk)

*please consult an attorney for legal advice or information pertaining to your documents, a notary is not qualified to provide legal advice. Contacting the receiving agency may also prove helpful for information as to their specific requirements for processing.